"This is art meant to evince the inner psyche,
that brew of experiences, is memories, fears,
passions, comforts, sorrows and joys. Aware that
human personality to a seething compound of
contradictions, Formica has sought a vivid pictorial
language communicate her exploration of the self."
GLORIA RUSSEL, SPRINGFIELD UNION

"She combines aspects of abstraction with the
charged fascination and repulsion of biological
forms. It's kind of like lifting up rocks looking for bugs
and finding a Jules Olitski, or maybe the reverse."
MATHIEU VICTOR, ARTVOICE

"Among those unlikeable forms of life, beautiful
flowers with strong color are strewed creating an
amazing aesthetic, but also sentimental opposition."
SUSAN SOFIE, AXIA CHRIMATISTRIAKI

"Jennifer Formica uses detailed photographs of such
subjects such as fish, embryos, and insects to reveal
the hidden beauty of the colors, textures and forms
of organic matter. Her unique talent is to show the
viewer something profound and awe-inspiring in
material that might otherwise escape notice."
ROB TAUBE, BROOKLYN SKYLINE

"The photograph mesmerizes the viewer with
the sensual pleasures of its colors and ductile
substance that are subsequently discovered
to represent viscous dimension embedded with
candles and wax worms. In both series, we only
secondarily reckon with the fact that these seductive
icons of surface are emblems of and decay."
ARLETTE KLARIC, BURCHFIELD-PENNEY ART CENTER
"The fish-in-slime imagery of Jennifer Formica's
"In Search of the Aquatic 'see' Nymph" may also
repulse a few tender souls, despite the photograph's
beautiful formal presence."
RICHARD HUNTINGTON, BUFFALO NEWS

"The narrow depth of field of the toy microscope
imbues the objects with a sense of mystery and
universality, while the extreme change in scale
makes something meek into something monumental.
Science in its purest form is meant to answer
questions for the sake of knowledge, much as
a child asks questions simply to know."
PERRY KIRK, ESSENCE: MATTER/SCIENCE/PHOTOGRAPHY

"Formica's science fiction gives a slimy new twist
to the memento mori, a typical Renaissance theme
...however we almost struggle to be repulsed.
Slithering vermin look fascinating here, even in their
familiar context of rotting leaves and moist earth."
MARC MAYER, ALBRIGHT-KNOX ART GALLERY

"The color alone is fabulous - purple and lavenders,
oranges and reds - but even more visceral are details
like the denting of the surface-tension of water,
or gel or plastic or some such crystalline substance,
under the soft, coppery bodies of the worms."
PATRICIA WRIGHT, HAMPSHIRE GAZETTE

"Alluring photographs that make us struggle not
to find them unlikeable."
MANIA APOSTOLOPOULOU, MONEY & LIFE MAGAZINE